Route 66 in Texas: driving the mother road in the Lone Star State

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The fifth state on your road trip sees you take Route 66 in Texas! You’ll only travel a small portion of the state through the panhandle in the very north.

The land here is very flat, and some may say boring, but there’s a lot to see and do if you’re looking for old Route 66 sights and icons.

If you’re looking to drive the mother road through Texas then this page is for you. It’ll answer your state specific questions about Route 66 as it drives right across the state and link to any further posts I have about this section.

large road sign along route 66 in Texas

If you’re just looking for specifics on what to do and where to stay along Rt 66 in Texas then please check out these posts which focus just on those topics:

If you’re looking for more State wide guides to learn more about Historic Route 66 all the way from the beginning to the end there’s lots of posts on this site about roadside attractions to see, how to drive the road and where to stay. Alternatively you might like to check out our Start Here page.

Texas Facts

State Name: Texas
Nickname: The Lone Star State
Population: 28.64 million

Route 66 mileage: 178 miles (286 km)
Major cities:
Amarillo
Top Attractions:
U-Drop Inn, Cadillac Ranch, Big Texan

Does Route 66 still exist in Texas?

Yes Route 66 still exists in Texas although over time some parts have changed. It’s very tempting to just stick to the I-40 but some of the original road was the service/frontage roads that run by it. There are also some dirt roads you can take that were part of the original road.

Through Amarillo you can see a tonne of antique shops that line the old road on 6th Avenue.

It’s easy to go off course so if you’re wanting to be faithful to the old road I encourage you to get a guide book which will help with directions.

Where does route 66 start and end in Texas?

Where does Route 66 begin in Texas?

Route 66 begins in Texas just over the state border from Texola in Oklahoma and the first town you’ll come to is called Shamrock (which is one of my favorite spots on the road!).

Where does Route 66 End in Texas?

The end point, if you’re driving East to West is a small ghost town called Glenrio which straddles the Texas and New Mexico state line.

What towns does Route 66 go through in Texas?

Route 66 goes through just a small number of towns and one large city on its way through Texas:

  • Shamrock
  • Mclean
  • Alanreed
  • Groom
  • Amarillo
  • Vega
  • Adrian

What is there to do on in Texas on Route 66?

While only giving you a small taster of the state as a whole, Texas still has a lot to offer if you just concentrate on the Route 66 section.

You’ll find plenty of museums along the road, including one of the quirkiest I’ve seen – the Devil’s Rope museum which is all about the history of barbed wire. Only on 66!

There’s also lots of iconic roadside stops that feature highly on any Route 66 roundup, and for good reason. The U drop Inn in Shamrock gives you art deco vintage that is amazing when lit up with neon (and is also a real life radiator springs location from Disney’s Cars!), the cadillac ranch is a must see and you have giant things every where! It is Texas after all!

Finally, if you’re doing the whole route, you’ll be halfway there! Texas has the midpoint location, and photo opportunity, in Adrian.

Route 66 in Texas – Maps

Here are some maps I’ve made of Route 66 along Texas. More coming soon!

Links For Your Route 66 trip

Get your Route 66 guidebook on Amazon

Get your car rental quote at RentalCars.com

Book Motels at Booking.com or Hotels.com

Check Flights at Skyscanner

Photo of author

Kirsty

Kirsty became obsessed with Route 66 after taking her kids to see Cars at the cinema way back in 2006. She first visited in 2014 and it didn't help the obsession at all. She now writes about the road, the history and hopes to encourage others to visit and keep it alive.

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